Model Size Restrictions Changing Thanks to Israel’s New Law

TLV fashion week

        Tel Aviv Fashion Week

 

The less than recent outcry for healthier models has finally been recognized. On January 1st, Israel passed a new law that bans too-skinny models from appearing in the media. Specifically, any model with a BMI (body-mass index) less than 18.5 is restricted from being publicized in advertisements and runway. A 5’8” adult female, which is essentially the shortest height for a runway model, must be a minimum of 120 pounds to have a BMI of 18.5.

The ban also includes the “Photoshop Law” where publications are obliged to reveal any computer alterations imposed on the models to make them look skinnier than they really are.

Response to this new law is positive and supporters say that it will encourage the use of healthier models locally, but internationally as well.

Ana Carolina Reston, Brazilian model, died at 26 in 2006

Ana Carolina Reston, Brazilian model, died at 26 in 2006. She was 5’8 and was 88 pounds when she died.

eliana ramos

Eliana Ramos, a Uruguayan model, died at age 18 in 2007. Her older sister, Luisel Ramos, died 6 months before her as a result of an eating disorder as well.

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Hila Elmalich, an Israeli model, died in 2007, weighing less than 60 pounds.

 

And it’s true. With deaths related to eating disorders becoming more frequent, the public agitation and demand for healthier models is becoming louder. Fortunately, the law has made an impact on fashion capitals. Countries including Spain and Italy have put the same guidelines into their fashion weeks. In Spain, no model with a BMI less than 18 is allowed on the runway, and in Italy it is 18.5.

Madrid Fashion Week

          Madrid Fashion Week

 

Unfortunately, this change can’t be expected to happen as quickly for other fashion capitals such as Britain and the States. Editor of British Vogue, Alexandra Shulman, was disappointed when her efforts in requesting that leading fashion designers make larger sample sizes failed. Similarly, Steven Kolb, chief executive of the CFDA (Council of Fashion Designers of America) stated that they are simply “creating awareness” and are not there to “mandate or enforce”. He ensured that there are no plans to make a law banning restrictions on models’ BMIs either.

But we’re off to a great start. With a trend that had soon become an epidemic no one saw an end too, the positive change in model sizes is slow and steady. Although curvy girls might not be the majority on the runway just yet, it is clear that the voluptuous body ideal from the 1950’s is creeping its way back in to style.

x, mother niche

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Inspiration Tuesday

Tuesdays have got to be the worst days of the week. Here’s my theory; your conserved energy from the weekend has been rightfully wasted for Monday, and hump day is still loathing its approach tomorrow.

So to get through Tuesdays a little easier, I decided to include a new segment: “Inspiration Tuesday” and add a little inspo and flare to everyone’s midweek miseries:)

With spring quickly approaching, I wanted to get everyone in the mood of the 60s flare that’s coming back into style this season! Aside from last year’s pop colour trend, this spring is full of contrast black and whites, and with these sunnies, you’ll be able to finish off any look.

So the bigger, the rounder, the better –

Specs Appeal

march12th - specs appeal

1 Hour Cardigan Fix – DIY!

The quickest, simplest, and cutest DIY on a cardigan that can be worn in a variety of different ways! Keep in classy – even in the grungiest of places (the background of my picture is quite an adequate example apparently…)

P.S. My little kitty feels it necessary to squeeze her little body in every picture and prove herself worthy of help. Just a subtle warning hehe.

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Step 1 – Buy your choice of fabric 150cm x 150cm. I used boiled wool but you are free to choose whatever you like!

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Step 2 – Fold the square in half

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Step 3 – Fold the rectangle in half again to make a square

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Step 4 – Measure 70cm from the closed corner (the one with no openings) of your square. Use chalk or something similar make the markings

Hint – measure 70cm of a ribbon, fix it in place of the corner and just use that 

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Step 5 – Once you  have the quarter of the circle drawn, cut along the chalked line. Make sure to only cut one layer at a time. If you cut all the layers at once, they will shift and your circle will become uneven.

Hint – I inserted pins along the straight edges to make sure the fabric and layers don’t move while cutting.

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Step 6 – When you have cut all of the layers, you should finish with a product that looks like this. I pinned the other sides so that the layers wouldn’t shift.

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Step 7 – Open up the circle.

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Step 8 – Now cut 2 congruent slits 15cm away from the centre of the circle. The shape/size of the slits is up to you, but I would stay away from circles just because it looks awkward.

Oh, and excuse the ugly ruler I used…

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Step 9 – Finish off by cutting out the slits. Here is half of a slit.

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And you’re done 🙂 Stay tuned for another post on all of the different ways to wear this cardigan!

Purse – Coach

Long-Sleeve Sweater – Urban Behaviour

Belt – Byway (vintage)

Shoes – Clarks

x, mother niche

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